Corruption Imminent

Truth time.

I made a video and had it edited completely, all I was missing was my introduction card. I was waiting to make the intro card after I had more DIYA footage. My luck being as it is the project corrupted and would not open. The folder I have has 3 project files (it’s corrupted before) and 21 clips and I think gremlins paid my computer a visit.

Anyway, I’m not sure when I will upload the first DIYA, but it will happen, eventually.

You guys rule! I can’t wait to stumble through this adventure of social media with you!

~Amanda

staff

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

This situation is being handled in an unacceptable draconian manner. Since when did the government turn from democratic to an oligarchy?

scishow

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)